Saturday, October 6, 2012

Brett Whiteley's apparition

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Harry Kent, Brett Whiteley's apparition #3 ink on paper,  56x76cm.


 I am enjoying just producing a series of quick inks on Canson Traditional 250gsm  paper in between writing a Contextual Studies paper for my Project and finishing a large oil towards my assessment.

I was reminded to actually enjoy my creative work and stop worrying about Universities and galleries by that wonderful American Expressionist painter, Dan McCaw:

"I believe that everyone has an inherent desire for original thought, and as an artist I find a passion to visually express something within myself that cannot be defined but have faith that it exists. I am constantly measuring the strength of my own convictions, trying not to change my art to fit what galleries, critics, and society deem acceptable, for when an artist chains himself to the opinions of others he or she will loose the most important thing that he has to contribute: his own voice and individuality.

Everyone has an internal compass, it has no needle to guide, you only know you are heading in the right direction when it just feels right. It is undefinable, your guides are instinct, feeling and intuition. It may lay past the likeness of the subject, you have to be willing to give up the safe, predictable and familiar, you have to be curious, vulnerable and willing to fall on your face. The treasures lay inside each of us waiting to be uncovered"  

What an uplifting breath of sanity.




Harry Kent, Brett Whiteley's apparition #4, ink on paper,  56x76cm.




Harry Kent, Brett Whiteley's apparition #5, ink on paper,  56x76cm.





Harry Kent, Brett Whiteley's apparition #6, ink on paper,  56x76cm.




Harry Kent, Brett Whiteley's apparition #2, ink on paper,  56x76cm.



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27 comments:

  1. Beautiful sketches Harry, and thanks for sharing Dan McCaw's thoughts, indeed very uplifting!

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    1. Thanks, Rodney. Glad Dan resonated with you too.

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  2. These ink prints are fascinating! You've cut down to the essence of the thing in these. Beautiful and haunting.

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    1. Thanks Rhonda. Yes, I'm exploring how little and how much is really necessary.

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  3. The artist is restless and dissatisfied,
    And the search for new forms, paradigm shift, occurs mainly within him, in his heart, the artist is not satisfied when he has to paint themes predefined by dealers of fine visual arts, the true artist is never satisfied with his art because the creative process happens in a dialectic, Thesis, antithesis, synthesis,
    This process " dialetic" is uninterrupted!!!
    Best regards

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    1. Always appreciated the ideas of such a reflective artist as you, Paulo.

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  4. Wow--these are fantastic. We would never think of your work as "safe, predictable or familiar"--you are far beyond just likeness.

    I spent part of the afternoon reading about Brett Whiteley and looking at his paintings on the internet; I like to think there's some cosmic reason for the link between you two.

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    1. So pleased you like them, Hallie. And delighted that youre chasing up Whiteley's life and work. I'm not sure about that cosmic connection, though he does seem to peer over my shoulder from time to time - not impressed!

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  5. these are quite wonderful.... your lines are instinctive and beautiful Harry... no art school can ever teach you that but they can knock it out of you if you aren't observant ;)

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    1. Thanks for positive take on these, Rahina. I guess in many respects i'm still a naive painter and the pursuit of Expressionism has put me at odds with realism in my technique. I rattle around between the two, not knowing where to settle or how to be me.

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  6. I'm a big Dan McCaw fan...so thanks for the quote. The drawings are amazing..I love each and every one.

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    1. So glad you like Dan Mc. And these inks! Thanks, Celeste.

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  7. These are fabulous! Every mark counts. No mark is extraneous. Your thesis show will be wonderful.

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    1. Thanks so much, Davida. Much appreciate your confidence in me.

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  8. Well the entire series is fascinating and wonderful, and I am especially blown away by these apparitions. Your voice is wholly original. And someday some artist of the next generation just may be haunted by you! :)

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    1. Thank you for sharing the words of Dan MacCaw. It is timely for me as I search for who I am. It truly is a breath of fresh air. It is difficult to shift from what's familiar to the unknown.

      I love these portraits which have a power in their simplicity and light touch. I am reminded how much I enjoyed ink in my first drawing class.

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    2. Wow, so glad you like the series, Dan. And i love the idea of getting to haunt some unfortunate dabbler in oils!

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    3. Thanks, Elizabeth. I love working in ink. Ive been to no end of trouble trying get some decent ink after i ran out two weeks back. Fortunately i found a specialist shop in Sydney and bought up big.

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  9. Sono meravigliosi. Da vero artista. Elvi

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    1. Grazie, Elvi. Così felice che ti piacciono.

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    1. Thanks Laura. And keep going with your blog!!!

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  11. Good work in place here.

    Apparition #2, breaks the mold from the rest of the pack as it somewhat resembles a woodblock print. I am reminded of Leonard Baskin, but then again we take our inspiration from sources that are sometimes unbeknownst to us

    Micros

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    1. Youre very kind, Micros. That's why i love an Indian ink that has plenty of shellac in it, to get the rich glossy deep black to looks like an embossed print.

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